Exquisite fruit sculptures by Stephanie Chubbuck.

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Stephanie Chubbuck - figurative fruit combines visual elements drawn from Dutch “Vanitas” still life painting.

Stephanie Chubbuck – figurative fruit combines visual elements drawn from Dutch “Vanitas” still life painting. Image Credit: Dean Powell.

Stephanie Chubbuck figurative fruits, combines visual elements drawn from Dutch “Vanitas” still-life painting.

Stephanie Chubbuck got her start in industrial design, but such work did little to satisfy her creativity. “I wanted color and concept,” she says. So she shifted gears and in 1994, earned a BFA in sculptural glass and fine metalworking from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Today, the Princeton-based artist is best known for her blown-glass fruit sculptures, including this installation of pears and peaches. To create her delicate pieces, Chubbuck shapes molten glass gathered from a 2,000-degree furnace — coloring and reheating it as it hardens — to achieve the proper form and hue. Once the glass cools to room temperature, she carefully cuts it with a diamond-coated dental tool and embellishes the piece with zippers, snaps, hooks or buttons. It’s an exacting process, and perfection is critical. Even the slightest flaw could detract from a viewer’s experience, Chubbuck says.

‘Two’ by Stephanie Chubbuck - Blown and cold worked ruby glass, cast bronze and mixed media, 18 inches high by 14 inches wide by 7 inches deep.

‘Two’ by Stephanie Chubbuck – Blown and cold worked ruby glass, cast bronze and mixed media, 18 inches high by 14 inches wide by 7 inches deep. Images Credit: Dean Powell.

“Ideally, I’ve produced beautiful objects that catch the viewer’s attention and provide time for visual flirtation and examination,” she explains. Chubbuck hopes that, upon closer inspection, viewers will see something of themselves in her work: “We all carry personal, emotional, and physical history. I want to evoke that.” The fruit is produced in blown glass, which is then “cold worked” to achieve the cuts and the installation of the various clothing closures and mixed media. The cuts are made by sculpting the surface away with diamond coated dental tools and a hand held jeweler’s drill. This technique is singular to my work and was developed through my own studio process. These complex cuts would not be possible with any other glass technique.

‘Two’ by Stephanie Chubbuck - Detailed view: Blown and cold worked ruby glass, cast bronze and mixed media, 18 inches high by 14 inches wide by 7 inches deep.

‘Two’ by Stephanie Chubbuck – Detailed view: Blown and cold worked ruby glass, cast bronze and mixed media, 18 inches high by 14 inches wide by 7 inches deep. Images Credit: Dean Powell.

The hyper-realistic colors are created by using glass bar and powdered pigments added in layers during shaping and blowing. The color is displayed in multiple translucent and opaque substrates, so the surface appears to be skin-like and alive similar to the way natural pearls have depth and an orient of light.

I refer to these works as figurative because they embody the form of fruit but imply corporeal and emotional humanity. They are allegories of my fascination with the rough edges of physicality, human nature, and human conditions. I intend for my peculiar combinations of elements to be beautiful although that beauty is often counter-intuitive. This odd visual seduction implies a complex identity. My objective is to seduce the viewer and elicit recognition of corporeal and emotional conditions that are unsettling, disturbing, erotic, humorous or a combination of these.

Information and Images are shared from artist site and article by Lindsey Gonzalez at Boston Magazine, on May 23rd, 2017. Images Credit: Dean Powell.



 

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